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About the Canterbury House of Studies

Welcome to the Canterbury House of Studies!

Scholé Academy offers courses to students from a wide range of Christian traditions. And because of this, we know we also need to provide small enclaves where students can learn with like-minded believers in the conviction of their faith. Our Orthodox students are invited to take classes at St. Raphael School, an online classical school in the Orthodox tradition. It sits as a “school within a school.”

The Canterbury House of Studies, likewise, sits within our classical academy as a small collection of courses offered in the Anglican/Episcopalian tradition. The collection of courses offered here will provide students with a path from which they can explore their Christian faith, church history, art, culture, music, and philosophy.

The courses in the Canterbury House of Studies were designed during a collaborative retreat, hosted by Fr. Gavin Dunbar, in beautiful Savannah, Georgia. Fr. Dunbar opened the doors to St. John’s Church and welcomed our small group of academics, teachers, poets, and clergy. We spent several days praying and talking together about the needs of our Anglican students as well as the opportunities that a house of studies might offer. We’re so grateful for all of those who were able to attend that special time in Savannah, and also to those who have collaborated with us through lots of emails, shared documents, and Zoom video conferences. A big THANK YOU to Fr. Nathan Carr and Mrs. Rhea Bright for their tireless work, effort, and energy to bring these courses to life!

The two courses you see below are merely the beginning of a much more elaborate plan. We know we need to roll this out slowly, gauge interest, and allow families to learn more about what we hope to do. In time, though, we hope to offer classes from 6th through 12th grades, across a wide range of disciplines, a journey through the Anglican faith, culminating in a 12th grade pilgrimage to Canterbury, England. More details about the entire scope and sequence of this program will be forthcoming!

If you have any questions about the Canterbury House of Studies, please feel free to email either principal, Joelle Hodge (jhodge@classicalsubjects.com), or our lead teacher, Rhea Bright.

Mission and Vision

Canterbury House of Studies assists families in forming the hearts and minds of students in the study of scripture and the practice of classical, Prayer Book Anglicanism, both catholic and reformed. 

Contributors

Gavin Dunbar: Since 2006 he has been rector of St. John’s Church in Savannah, a parish that is committed to the doctrine and worship of the reformation and catholic tradition as embodied in the 1928 Prayer Book. He studied classics at the University of Toronto (Trinity College) and Dalhouse University; and holds an MDiv from Wycliffe College, Toronto. He was ordained a priest in 1992 and served as rector of the Parish of St. Barnabas, Ecum Secum, on the eastern shore of Nova Scotia, before coming to Savannah in 1997. Currently he serves as president of the Prayer Book Society of the USA, and as chairman of the board of governors of Ralston College, a liberal arts start-up. He has written extensively on the doctrine and liturgy of the Anglican tradition.

Nate Carr: Headmaster of the Academy of Classical Christian Studies, Nathan Carr’s introduction to and subsequent love of Great Books occurred in the Western Civ classroom at Oklahoma Baptist University. After graduation from the University of Central Oklahoma, Nathan enrolled at Reformed Theological Seminary and earned a Masters of Arts in religion. He has also completed postgraduate work at the University of Toronto’s Wycliffe College, is an ordained priest in the Episcopal Church, and is vicar of St. James Episcopal Church of Oklahoma City. He is married to Sarah, and they have 6 children..

Graham Marsh:

David Anderson: David Anderson is an associate professor in the University of Oklahoma English department. He specializes in the literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, in particular such authors as William Shakespeare, John Donne, John Milton, George Herbert, and Christopher Marlowe. His first book, Martyrs and Players in Early Modern England, examined the relationship between the Reformation-era martyrological tradition and the era’s tragic drama. He is currently at work on a book about Shakespeare and the Christian doctrine of divine love. Proud husband of Abby, and father of Samuel and Peter, Dr. Anderson attends All Souls’ Episcopal Church in Oklahoma City. He was born and raised in the province of Ontario.

Kate Marsh: Kathleen Marsh is a Christian poet who recently moved to Oklahoma City from Oregon. She holds an MFA in poetry from the University of California, Riverside, and an MA in religion and the arts from Yale Divinity School. Her poems and essays have appeared in Salon, Tin House, Connotation Press, Boston Poetry Magazine, and elsewhere. Rough Hymns, her first collection of poetry, was recently published by Finishing Line Press. In June, she married the love of her life, Fr. Graham Marsh, curate at All Souls Episcopal Church.

Rhea Bright: Rhea holds a BA from the University of King’s College in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and an MA in classics from Dalhousie University, also in Halifax. Her classical studies involved Latin and Greek, as well as classical and medieval literature, philosophy, and theology. King’s Foundation Year Program, an early integrated Great Books curriculum, and the Dalhousie Classics department formed and nurtured what became a lifelong love of the classics and a deep appreciation of the contribution of the ancient world to whatsoever is good and true and beautiful. She also has a Bachelor’s in education from Acadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. She is married to Patrick, an ordained Anglican priest, who served for over 24 years at All Souls’ Episcopal Church in Oklahoma City. Together they raised 5 sons, now grown. They are now living in a 170-year-old house in rural Nova Scotia, where Father Bright, retired from full-time ministry, assists in a local parish.

Mrs Bright taught ancient and medieval humanities as an adjunct at the University of Central Oklahoma for 9 years, and over the course of 10 years at Providence Hall and the Academy of Classical Christian Studies in Oklahoma City, she taught Latin, logic, Bible, and ancient omnibus (integrated literature and history). She also served as chair of humanities, developing the Academy Omnibus program. Among her greatest joys, she counts introducing young minds to the beauty and truth and goodness of old things.

Pilgrimage to Canterbury, England

Pilgrimage

We are hoping to build a travel experience for graduating 12th grade students to enjoy if they have been part of Canterbury House of Studies program. We are still in the early stages of brainstorming and thinking broadly about what the full extent of our program will be, as well as what a group trip like this could entail. We will of course flesh this out in time and build a more robust program leading up to such an event. But for now, we want you to know that we do anticipate designing a “pilgrimage” to include the following kinds of experiences:

  • The Gothic Cathedral
  • The Museum
  • Music
  • Prayer and Place
  • The Rootedness of Beauty in Nature
  • Moments of Place
  • Markets, People, Culture: The Terroir Experience
  • Group Meals
  • Language and Learning to Speak
  • An Experience of Human Suffering, Brutality, and a Recognition of Evil
  • Literature and Philosophy

Whether a pilgrimage involves hiking along the road to Assisi, climbing the steps to the caves at Subiaco (where Saint Benedict lived), or descending into the crypt at Saint Peter’s in Rome, the outward journey is an awakening and each step becomes a dance in the inward journey toward God. For students of Canterbury House of Studies, the call to be transformed ourselves can, in many ways, become metaphors that we live through as we travel through England. As pilgrims, rather than as tourists, our outward journey becomes an inward journey to God.

Courses at the Canterbury House of Studies

Middle-School Course

Term: Yearlong 2020–21, September 8–May 28
Target Grade Levels: Grades 6th–8th graders welcome (see placement details below)
Schedule: 2x / week, 60–75 min.
Price: $595.00

Course Sections (choose one)
Section 1:
M/W 9:30 a.m. ET with Mrs. Rhea Bright

The Early Church: The Bible to the Nicene Creed

The purpose of the class for middle school students is to address the question: How did we get from Jesus to the Church? Where did all these beliefs and teachings, rites and rituals come from? Does all that really matter?

In order to begin answering those questions, the students first read through key sections of the Bible, tracing the Bible’s story of creation, fall and redemption. Students learn important terms, images and stories from Bible, the different ways of interpreting scripture from the literal to the allegorical, the connections between the Old and New Testaments, and what it means that Jesus Christ is the fulfillment of the law and the prophets and the Savior of the world.

Students also study the historical events that followed Christ’s resurrection and ascension in order to understand where “the Church” comes from. They learn about the development of church rites and institutional practices through the Apostolic and Patristic periods, the determination of the canon of scripture, the Ecumenical Councils and the core doctrines of Christianity. Finally, the students examine the Nicene Creed in order to understand the crucial doctrines of the Trinity and the Incarnation and to know why they matter.

This is a course on the origins of the church at a time when the church was undivided, an exploration and appreciation of the common history that all Christians share so that we know what we have in common, before “denominations” came to be. This provides a foundation for understanding our distinct traditions.

Most homework will be reading accompanied by guiding questions. Students will be expected to engage in discussion of the reading to the best of their ability. There will also be writing exercises, including paragraph exercises and short essays.

Syllabus: View course syllabus here.

Placement:
There are no formal prerequisites for this course. When considering whether this course is a good fit for your student, please consider that students should be developmentally prepared to think allegorically and metaphorically and to engage in a 7th- to 9th-grade corporate learning environment.

How is faith integrated with this course?
Canterbury House of Studies is grounded in classical Anglicanism as expressed in the Common Prayer tradition and the Anglican formularies. This course is a study of the Early Church before divisions existed between East and West, or Catholic and Protestant, and seeks to be as objective as possible in its treatment of that time period.  All are welcome in Canterbury classes; all Christian traditions are respected.

See also Schole Academy’s statement on Faith and Culture.

Required Texts:

  • Bible, KJV (Students are permitted, even encouraged, to use other translations of the Bible to help their understanding of the assigned readings, but we will be reading and quoting from the Authorized Version (the KJV) in class, so students are required to read from the KJV and to bring it to class.)
  • When the Church Was Young, Marcellino D’Ambrosio (ISBN: 9781616367770)
  • Online handouts: Apostles’ Creed, Nicene Creed, Quicumque vult (also called the Creed of St Athanasius)

Rhea Bright holds a B.A. from the University of King’s College in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and an M.A. in Classics from Dalhousie University, also in Halifax. Her Classical studies involved Latin and Greek, as well as classical and medieval literature, philosophy and theology. King’s Foundation Year Program, an early integrated great books curriculum, and the Dalhousie Classics department formed and nurtured what became a life-long love of the classics and a deep appreciation of the contribution of the ancient world to whatsoever is good and true and beautiful. She also has a Bachelor of Education from Acadia University in Wolfville, N.S. Rhea taught Ancient and Medieval Humanities at the University of Central Oklahoma for nine years, and over the course of ten years at Providence Hall and The Academy of Classical Christian Studies, she taught Latin, Logic, Bible, and integrated ancient literature and history. Rhea is married to Father Patrick Bright, an ordained Anglican priest who served for over 24 years at All Souls’ Episcopal Church in Oklahoma City and recently retired from full-time ministry. Together they raised five sons, now grown. They now live in a 170-year-old house in rural Nova Scotia. rbright.scholeacademy@gmail.com

 

Red checkmarkComputer: You will need a stable, reliable computer, running with a processor with a speed of 1 GHz or better on one of the following operating systems: Mac OS X with Mac OS 10.7 or later; Windows 8, 7, Vista (with SP1 or later), or XP (with SP3 or later). We do not recommend using an iPad or other tablet for joining classes. An inexpensive laptop or netbook would be much better solutions, as they enable you to plug an Ethernet cable directly into your computer. Please note that Chromebooks are allowed but not preferred, as they do not support certain features of the Zoom video conference software such as breakout sessions and annotation, which may be used by our teachers for class activities.

Red checkmarkHigh-Speed Internet Connection: You will also need access to high-speed Internet, preferably accessible via Ethernet cable right into your computer. Using Wi-Fi may work, but will not guarantee you the optimal use of your bandwidth. The faster your Internet, the better. We recommend using a connection with a download/upload speed of 5/1 Mbps or better. You can test your Internet connection here.

Red checkmarkWebcam: You may use an external webcam or one that is built in to the computer. Webcam Recommendations: Good (PC only) | Best (Mac and PC)

Red checkmarkHeadset: We recommend using a headset rather than a built-in microphone and speakers. Using a headset reduces the level of background noise heard by the entire class. Headset Recommendations: USB | 3.5mm

Red checkmarkZoom: We use a web conferencing software called Zoom for our classes, which enables students and teachers to gather from around the globe face to face in real time. Zoom is free to download and easy to use. unnamed-e1455142229376 To download Zoom:

  1. Visit zoom.us/download.
  2. Click to download the first option listed, Zoom Client for Meetings.
  3. Open and run the installer on your computer.
  4. In August, students will be provided with instructions and a link for joining their particular class.

Red checkmarkScanner: In this class, students frequently submit homework assignments by scanning pages from their workbooks. Students and/or their parents should have easy access to a scanner and the ability to use it.

Upper-School Course

Term: Yearlong 2020–21, September 8–May 28
Target Grade Levels: Grades 9–10
Schedule: 2x / week, 60–75 min.
Price: $595.00

Course Sections
Section 1:
M/W 2:45 p.m. ET with Rhea Bright

 

Moral Theology and the Sanctification of Time in the Anglican Tradition
This course for high schoolers asks the age-old questions about human nature posed by poets and philosophers from ancient times. What does it mean to be fully human? What is the soul’s good? How is the soul properly ordered toward its good? How do we live in a right relation with one another and with the natural world? In short, what does it mean to be God’s children?

This course explores those questions in two ways. The first part of the course examines the soul itself and the cardinal virtues of prudence, courage, temperance and justice as being proper to the soul. Christian moral theology is based on the ancient idea of the human soul created in the image of the Trinitarian God for the purpose of knowing and loving God. The right ordering of the soul to God and its relation to all of God’s creation is examined primarily through the theology of St Augustine of Hippo, St Thomas Aquinas, and Josef Pieper, with a look it its poetic expression in Dante’s Purgatorio.

The second part of the course considers the role of prayer, scripture, and the liturgy of the Church in nurturing the soul and the community by instilling the virtues of faith, hope, and charity through daily prayer and scripture reading. The English Reformers were deeply grounded in the knowledge that Christians are called into a union of love with God and one another. Their grand vision was to provide for all the English-speaking people a simplified rule of life, informed by the Benedictine rule: the sanctification of time in the tradition of Common Prayer.

The goal of this course is to recall the Anglican spiritual heritage in order to help form young souls into a sound, thoughtful and loving relationship with God and His creation through common prayer. Students read from the works of Anglican theologians, hymnodists, 19th century Tractarians, 20th century apologists, and more.

Syllabus: View course syllabus here.

Placement: Please read about our new process above.
This course is suitable for rising 10th–12th graders who have strong reading skills and an interest in discussing philosophical and theological questions. This class asks for active intellectual engagement from the students. Assignments will be reading, often with short responses. Students are expected to read their assignments with attention and come to class prepared to engage in a discussion of the topics of the day. Students will also be asked to write end-of-semester essays in order to expand their personal thinking on selected topics.

How is faith integrated with this course?
Canterbury House of Studies is grounded in classical Anglicanism as expressed in the Common Prayer tradition and the Anglican formularies. The Anglican way of praying the words of Scripture, and of reading the Bible prayerfully as well as systematically, is a gift to the whole Christian world, and most Christians would find value in it. All are welcome in Canterbury classes; all Christian traditions are respected.

This class considers the cardinal virtues from the perspective of ancient philosophy and ancient, medieval and modern theology, and always in the light of the Holy Scriptures. The theological virtues are explored through the via media of the English prayer book system and lectionaries.

See also Schole Academy’s statement on Faith and Culture.

Required Texts:

  1. Bible, KJV. Any edition of the KJV (also called The Authorized Version) is acceptable, because all references and quotes will be cited by book, chapter and verse.
  2. Josef Pieper, The Four Cardinal Virtues. (ISBN-13: 978-0268001032)
  3. The Book of Common Prayer: The Texts of 1549, 1559, and 1662. Oxford World’s Classics. Ed. Brian Cummings (ISBN-13: 978-0199645206)
  4. Online selections from works such as the following will be assigned:
    1. Plato, Republic
    2. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics
    3. Augustine, De Trinitate
    4. Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae
    5. Dante, Purgatorio
    6. Julian of Norwich, Revelations of Divine Love

Rhea Bright holds a B.A. from the University of King’s College in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and an M.A. in Classics from Dalhousie University, also in Halifax. Her Classical studies involved Latin and Greek, as well as classical and medieval literature, philosophy and theology. King’s Foundation Year Program, an early integrated great books curriculum, and the Dalhousie Classics department formed and nurtured what became a life-long love of the classics and a deep appreciation of the contribution of the ancient world to whatsoever is good and true and beautiful. She also has a Bachelor of Education from Acadia University in Wolfville, N.S. Rhea taught Ancient and Medieval Humanities at the University of Central Oklahoma for nine years, and over the course of ten years at Providence Hall and The Academy of Classical Christian Studies, she taught Latin, Logic, Bible, and integrated ancient literature and history. Rhea is married to Father Patrick Bright, an ordained Anglican priest who served for over 24 years at All Souls’ Episcopal Church in Oklahoma City and recently retired from full-time ministry. Together they raised five sons, now grown. They now live in a 170-year-old house in rural Nova Scotia.

Red checkmarkComputer: You will need a stable, reliable computer, running with a processor with a speed of 1 GHz or better on one of the following operating systems: Mac OS X with Mac OS 10.7 or later; Windows 8, 7, Vista (with SP1 or later), or XP (with SP3 or later). We do not recommend using an iPad or other tablet for joining classes. An inexpensive laptop or netbook would be much better solutions, as they enable you to plug an Ethernet cable directly into your computer. Please note that Chromebooks are allowed but not preferred, as they do not support certain features of the Zoom video conference software such as breakout sessions and annotation, which may be used by our teachers for class activities.

Red checkmarkHigh-Speed Internet Connection: You will also need access to high-speed Internet, preferably accessible via Ethernet cable right into your computer. Using Wi-Fi may work, but will not guarantee you the optimal use of your bandwidth. The faster your Internet, the better. We recommend using a connection with a download/upload speed of 5/1 Mbps or better. You can test your Internet connection here.

Red checkmarkWebcam: You may use an external webcam or one that is built in to the computer. Webcam Recommendations: Good (PC only) | Best (Mac and PC)

Red checkmarkHeadset: We recommend using a headset rather than a built-in microphone and speakers. Using a headset reduces the level of background noise heard by the entire class. Headset Recommendations: USB | 3.5mm

Red checkmarkZoom: We use a web conferencing software called Zoom for our classes, which enables students and teachers to gather from around the globe face to face in real time. Zoom is free to download and easy to use. unnamed-e1455142229376 To download Zoom:

  1. Visit zoom.us/download.
  2. Click to download the first option listed, Zoom Client for Meetings.
  3. Open and run the installer on your computer.
  4. In August, students will be provided with instructions and a link for joining their particular class.

Red checkmarkScanner: In this class, students frequently submit homework assignments by scanning pages from their workbooks. Students and/or their parents should have easy access to a scanner and the ability to use it.

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Explore our courses!

First, read the available course descriptions, noting prerequisites, target grades, and course objectives. If you think your student is prepared for the course, go ahead and register. After registration, a placement assessment may be provided to students, depending on the course and the student’s previous enrollment with Scholé Academy. Registration is finalized when the student’s placement assessment has been returned by the course instructor with placement confirmation.

 

All Courses | By Subject | By Grade

Read the Student-Parent Handbook.

Please take careful note of our teaching philosophy, our technology requirements, our school policies, the parent agreement, and the distinctions between our grade levels.

Double-check the course section dates and times.

Make sure they don’t conflict with other activities in your schedule or other courses you are purchasing. Our system will not catch double-bookings!

You’re ready to add course selections to your cart!

Our Assistant to the Principal will be in touch with you after your enrollment to help you with next steps, including any placement evaluations that may be required for your course selections.

This registration will be finalized when the student’s placement assessment has been returned by the course instructor with placement confirmation.

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